Author Archives: admin

Cyprus: Massacre on Migration 2018

The good news is bird trapping activity in the British Eastern Sovereign Base Area on Cyprus (ESBA) has declined in comparison with autumn 2017. There were 33 % less active trapping sites, CABS (Committee against Bird Slaughter) found less set traps and the number of set nets found had dropped by more than 63 % in just one year. This is due to new personnel in the SBA Police taking the issue of illegal bird killings seriously. In just one year they have managed to radically reduce the trapping levels. We were very impressed with the team’s work.

Source: Cyprus: Massacre on Migration 2018 | Wildlife expert, TV Presenter, Author and Conservationist

Hope Farm – saving butterflies on farmland

As you may have seen in an earlier post, the extreme weather of spring and summer 2018 meant a tough year for farmers and wildlife alike, notably for our birds. Territory holdings and breeding success suffered for many species across the farm and now we can only hope to support as many birds as possible through the winter for a successful season next summer. However, the endless sunshine didn’t bring doom and gloom for everyone. For our pollinators the scorching summer sun brought great joy and a record year for us.

At Hope Farm, it’s not just our birds that we monitor to the national gold label standard. We also monitor our butterflies under the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme. The surveys take place every week from April to September along three transects, and this year’s butterfly index was a record high…

Click here to read the rest of the article.: The Butterflies and the Bees – Hope Farm 2018 – Farming – Farming – The RSPB Community

Plumage abnormalities

From time to time you may encounter a bird with plumage that is rather different from that which would be typical for the species. Some of these abnormalities may result from abnormal feather growth or feather loss, while others may be a consequence of problems with pigmentation.

Changes in the amount and/or distribution of particular feather pigments are some of the most commonly reported types of plumage abnormality. Most often, these abnormalities occur within the common feather pigments, like melanin, and so we tend to see a pattern to the types of abnormalities being reported. Through our Abnormal Plumage Survey, we know that the most frequently spotted plumage irregularities are when birds gain odd white feathers.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Plumage abnormalities | BTO – British Trust for Ornithology

Deep learning tools for urban ecoacoustic assessment

Cities support unique and valuable ecological communities, but understanding urban wildlife is limited due to the difficulties of assessing biodiversity. Ecoacoustic surveying is a useful way of assessing habitats, where biotic sound measured from audio recordings is used as a proxy for population abundance and/or activity. However, existing algorithms systematically over and underestimate measures of biotic activity in the presence of typical urban non‐biotic sounds in recordings.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: CityNet—Deep learning tools for urban ecoacoustic assessment – Fairbrass – – Methods in Ecology and Evolution – Wiley Online Library

Petition to ban sale of mist nets

Howe Park Wood Nature Day by Julie Lane 1 July 2016

Howe Park Wood Nature Day by Julie Lane 1 July 2016

Amazon, Ebay and others are selling mist nets advertising them for ‘keeping birds away from orchards’. These nets can be lethal to birds caught in them and is illegal to use them without an appropriate BTO licence

Click here to sign the petition.

Sir David Attenborough: Climate change ‘our greatest threat’

The naturalist Sir David Attenborough has said climate change is humanity’s greatest threat in thousands of years.
The broadcaster said it could lead to the collapse of civilisations and the extinction of “much of the natural world”.
He was speaking at the opening ceremony of United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Katowice, Poland.
The meeting is the most critical on climate change since the 2015 Paris agreement.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Sir David Attenborough: Climate change ‘our greatest threat’ – BBC News

The Insect Survey web site is now live

MKNHS members mothing at Linford Lakes NR by Julie Lane9 July2016

MKNHS members mothing at Linford Lakes NR by Julie Lane9 July2016

The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) has been running two trap networks since 1964. Its long-term data are unique providing information on aphids, larger moths and many other migrating insects to scientists, growers, conservation organisations, individuals and policy makers. As such, the networks represent the most comprehensive standardised long-term data on insects in the World and have a wide range of fundamental and applied uses.

The Insect Survey is host to a nationwide network of light-traps and suction-traps that collect invaluable data on the migration of moths and aphids.

Click here for more information.

Fungus Walk Brill Common 16 December 2018

The Buckinghamshire Fungus Group are conducting a field trip to Brill Common 16 December 2018:

Dear member(s),
Firstly may I apologise for the inconvenience caused by the temporary loss of our website which thankfully is now restored. If you normally access the site via your Favourites you may find, as I did, that it still says it’s unavailable. By googling Bucks Fungus Group and resaving it in Favourites this problem should be overcome.
Secondly, our final walk of the year is on Sunday, December 16th at Brill Common. Please note the late start time: 11.00. Details are (hopefully!) at www.bucksfungusgroup.org.uk/events.html  with added instructions should the weather be particularly inclement.
I’ll be sending out a last minute reminder in a couple of weeks, but other than that sadly that’s it for 2018! May I take this opportunity to thank you all for your support and we look forward to seeing you in 2019. – fingers crossed for a really good year for fungi after the somewhat disappointing one we’ve just experienced. I’ll be back in touch with details of any Springtime events once arranged.
Happy Christmas and a Prosperous New Year to all!
Penny

Click here for more information.

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

RSPB Podcast – Where have all the sparrows gone?

House Sparrow by Harry Appleyard, Furzton Lake 28 December 2016

House Sparrow by Harry Appleyard, Furzton Lake 28 December 2016

House sparrows have made their homes close to human habitation for centuries but since the 1970s their numbers have plummeted by 60 per cent and the decline is particularly noticeable in our towns and cities. Read more…
Read more at 

Scientists have found the oldest butterfly or moth fossils

Butterflies and moths, the Lepidoptera, are among the most beautiful of insects, familiar to almost everyone through thousands of different species from all around the world. But how they evolved has been something of a mystery to scientists because of a surprising lack of Lepidoptera fossils.

Now researchers in the Netherlands have discovered Lepidoptera fossils that are older than any previously found, proving these familiar insects have been around for at least 200m years. The particular type of fossils found mean we have to rethink Lepidoptera evolution. They imply that the long tube butterflies and moths use to suck nectar from flowers actually developed before flowering plants did, so it must have originally evolved for a different purpose.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Scientists have accidentally found the oldest ever butterfly or moth fossils

Notable Trees in Milton Keynes

National Tree Week started on Saturday 24th November and finishes on Sunday 2ndDecember, so you still have time to get involved!

The Parks Trust has produced a factsheet about the notable tress in Milton Keynes. Click here to download the factsheet.

The Publications section of our own website has details of Top Trees and Top Orchards in Milton Keynes.

Mealworms and Hedgehogs: a definite no-no

In the last edition of Nature’s Home magazine, in the section where I get to visit a gardener who is doing amazing things for wildlife, I included a letter from a family who had made a lovely bug house with Hedgehog nestbox incorporated in its base. I thought they had been really creative, and they clearly get a lot of pleasure from the Hedgehogs that come to visit.

However, what I failed to register was where they said that they feed their Hedgehogs on mealworms.

Quite rightly, several people have picked me up on the fact that I should have pointed out that mealworms should not be fed to Hedgehogs.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

RSPBNBLG Talk – Upper Ray Meadows and Calvert Jubilee 13 December 2018

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are hosting a talk:

Location: Cruck Barn, City Discovery Centre, Alston Drive, Bradwell Abbey, Milton Keynes
Postcode: MK13 9AP (Google map)

Upper Ray Meadows and Calvert Jubilee are two fabulous reserves, managed by our local Wildlife Trust, BBOWT, to benefit wildlife – birds, butterflies, bees – and lots more too. Andy has worked on them for some time and will give us an insight into the main habitats found there, the species that they support and how BBOWT manages these sites to create the perfect conditions for wildlife to thrive.

Time: Doors open 7.15pm for a prompt 7.45pm start, ends at 10pm

Price: Group members £3, Non-group members £4, Children £1

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

The social fabric of citizen science

Linford Lakes NR BioBlitz by David Easton. 24 June 2016

Linford Lakes NR BioBlitz by David Easton. 24 June 2016

Insect conservation needs sound information on species distribution trends. Developing this evidence relies—in practice—on long-term engagement of volunteers who observe and record species over large spatial and temporal scales. Many biodiversity monitoring schemes, including those for insects, are highly dependent on conservation-based citizen science programs with a long-term continuity. As these schemes are built entirely on good will, the nature of social relations and networks is pivotal to success.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: The social fabric of citizen science—drivers for long-term engagement in the German butterfly monitoring scheme | SpringerLink

Insect Declines — Podcast

What’s happening to all the insects? And what can we do about it? Join Nick as he interviews Brad Lister , who recently published an article showing dramatic insect declines, and Helen Roy , a conservation biologist in the UK, as they discuss this important topic.

Click here for more information.: Insect Declines — Entocast

Do robins migrate?

Robin by Peter Hassett, College Lake 29 December 2016

Robin by Peter Hassett, College Lake 29 December 2016

Plant an Apple Tree Today

 

European robins (Erithacus rubecula) live throughout Europe (except in the far north), Russia and western Siberia. British and Irish robins are largely sedentary, and most do not move more than 5km. Those that do are usually adult males moving between their breeding and winter territories.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: The RSPB: Ask an expert: My wife says robins migrate – I say NO! Who is right?

Plant an Apple Tree Today

Apples originated on the flanks of the Tian Shan Mountains on the border between Kazakhstan and China, where wild forests of them still grow to this day, their seeds spread by bears. The familiar fruit of the apple tree is of course a seed dispersal mechanism, intended to tempt a hungry bear or other large mammal to eat it entirely, with the hope that some pips are passed out undamaged and at a distance from the parent tree, along with a healthy dollop of fertiliser to help them grow. Bears are well known to have a sweet tooth (as both Winnie-the-Pooh and Paddington would attest), and so it may well have been selection by bears for the sweetest fruit that resulted in the progenitors of the apples we love today.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Plant an Apple Tree Today – NearbyWild

This crab could save your life – if humans don’t wipe it out first

Horseshoe crab outlived dinosaurs but is no match for medicine’s hunger for its blood.

Few people in the world are aware their wellbeing may one day depend on a blue-blooded crab that looks like a cross between the facehugger from Alien and a gigantic louse. Fewer still realise this ancient creature now faces its greatest threat in more than 450m years.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: This crab could save your life – if humans don’t wipe it out first | Environment | The Guardian

RSPBNBLG Walk – Brandon Marsh 2 December 2018

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are leading a field trip to:

Location: Meet in car park (free) signed off minor road 1½ miles west of Brandon, SE of
Coventry. SP 386 761
Postcode: CV3 3GW (Google map)

Warwickshire Wildlife Trust’s flagship reserve with visitor centre, cafe, shop
and toilets. Mature gravel pits, marsh and wet woodland hold many species
including winter finches. Past visits produced peregrine and even an otter!
Paths are wet and narrow, unfortunately not suitable for wheelchairs or
buggies, wellies advised.

Walk leader : Brian Lloyd

Time: 10 am to 1 pm

Price: Reserve entry £2.50, £1.50 concession

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

RSPBNBLG Quiz Night 23 November 2018

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are hosting a talk:

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE FUN QUIZ NIGHT
Location: Wicken Sports Club, Wicken, Milton Keynes
Postcode: MK19 6BU (Google map)

Our Annual General Knowledge Fun Quiz Night

Teams of up to FIVE people – bring your own team or come along and join up with others.
£4 per person and a prize for each member of the winning team.
Extra “Spot round” in the interval for £1 – with an individual prize.
Wicken Sports Club will sell refreshments: tea, coffee and a bar.
Please book in advance by Friday 16 November
To Ann Davies e-mail: AnnRSPBNBucks@hotmail.co.uk

Time: Doors open 7.30pm for a prompt 8pm start

Price: £4 per person for main quiz, £1 per person for interval “spot” round

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

What its like Work for a Wildlife Conservation charity

At the beginning of June, I landed a part-time job as a data entry assistant for, ‘Caring for God’s Acre’, a secular charity that conserves old cemeteries for wildlife and heritage. I am part of the Beautiful Burial Ground team over the next four years from May 2018 – May 2022. In which we have four main aims:

Click here to read the rest of the article.: What its like Work for a Wildlife Conservation charity – The Unconventional Naturalist

25 years of wader declines

Lapwing by Peter Garner, Floodplain Forest NR, 25 March 2016

Lapwing by Peter Garner, Floodplain Forest NR, 25 March 2016

This article summarises a Bird Study paper arising from a 25-year Scottish study of breeding Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Redshank & Curlew. The story is set against a backdrop of a changing farming…

Click here to read the rest of the article.: 25 years of wader declines | wadertales

State of the World’s Fungi 2018

Fungus by Peter Hassett, Bow Brickhill 1 November 2014

Fungus by Peter Hassett, Bow Brickhill 1 November 2014

The facts and figures contained in the pages of the 2018 State of the World’s Fungi report and this website will probably come as a total revelation to many people. The first of its kind outlining the state of the world’s fungi, the report and associated website highlight just how important fungi are to all life on Earth. It is clear that Fungi should definitely be viewed on a par with the plant and animal kingdoms and that we have only just started to scratch the surface of knowledge of this incredible and diverse group of organisms. What also becomes apparent is that when looking for nature-based solutions to some of our most critical global challenges, fungi could provide many of the answers.

Click here for more information.: State of the World’s Fungi 2018

Proposed White-tailed Eagle Reintroduction on the Isle of Wight

White-tailed Eagles were once widespread along the whole of the South Coast of England, from Cornwall to Kent, before being driven to extinction by relentless persecution that began in the Middle Ages. The last pair bred on Culver Cliff on the Isle of Wight in 1780. Many parts of southern England remain highly suitable for the species, and following the reintroduction of White-tailed Eagles to Scotland – where there are now over 130 breeding pairs – we believe that an English reintroduction would be equally successful and the best way to re-establish these magnificent birds in their former haunts. Restoring a population of White-Eagles on the South Coast would help to link populations in Scotland and Ireland with those in the Netherlands and France.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Proposed White-tailed Eagle Reintroduction on the Isle of Wight – Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation

Wiedemmania simplex – an Ice Age survivor

A species of fly that has lived in the Cairngorms since the last Ice Age is at risk from climate change, Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has said.
The tiny Wiedemmania simplex inhabits remote Loch Avon and is found nowhere else in Britain.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Ancient trees of Milton Keynes

The Woodland Trust has released an interactive map which shows the locations of the UK’s oldest trees. The Ancient Tree Inventory can help you find the UK’s oldest trees by location, by tree species and by status.

On the map each tree’s marker includes an ‘A’, ‘V’ or ‘N’ to indicate if the tree is of ancient, veteran or notable status. Ancient trees are those that are in the third and final stages of their life. The age of this final stage varies for different species of trees, as some species live longer than others. Oaks, yews and sweet chestnuts can live to over a 1,000 years old. Veteran trees are old trees which haven’t quite reached ancient status. Notable trees are usually mature large trees which for some reason stand out in their local environment.

Anyone can add ancient, veteran or notable trees to the Ancient Tree Inventory. The Woodland Trust has a recording guide which provides instructions on how to measure a tree and how to record different tree forms.

This link will take you to a copy of the map centered on Milton Keynes

Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation to hunt their prey. Scientists are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators. While some moths have evolved ears that detect the ultrasonic calls of bats, many types of moths remain deaf. In those moths, researchers have found that the insects developed types of “stealth coating” that serve as acoustic camouflage to evade hungry bats. Neil will describe his work during the Acoustical Society of America’s 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9. This image shows a Madagascar bullseye (Antherina suraka), one of the moth species used in Thomas Neil’s research. Credit: Thomas Neil

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

10 ways to help butterflies and moths this autumn

https://www.wcl.org.uk/wanted-the-orange-spotted-emerald-stolen-from-future-generations.asp

Find out how you can help wildlife in your garden this autumn. Make a banquet for butterflies. Red Admiral adults are often abundant during the autumn months and a frequent visitor to gardens if the weather is mild as they feed to build up reserves before the arrival of winter…

Click here to read the rest of the article.: 10 ways to help butterflies and moths this autumn

Nomenclature Glossary for Invertebrates

Longhorn beetle (Stranglia maculata) by Peter Hassett Silverdale 18 July 2009

Longhorn beetle (Stranglia maculata) by Peter Hassett Silverdale 18 July 2009

BioLink’s TCV trainee, Holly Dillon writes: “One thing I’ve realised from attending the Biolinks courses over the past few months is that it’s not always the collection of specimens or microscopic examination that puts people off invertebrate ID, some people seem to almost have a mental block and feel out of depth whenever any binomial names (or Latin/scientific names) are mentioned. Binomial nomenclature is a formal system for naming species and it was put in place to avoid confusion, not cause it.” Check out Holly’s new glossary that explains some more of these commonly used Latin and Greek words and their translations.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Nomenclature Glossary for Invertebrates | Biodiversity Projects

Give local dormice a better home today

Urgent appeal on behalf of dormice in your local area

You may be surprised to know that the number of dormice has declined by more than a third since 2000 across many places in Britain. The damage to or complete loss of woodland and hedgerows and the decline of coppicing are all responsible for the decreasing populations of dormice.

We need to raise £40,000 by 23 November 2018 to cover the costs of all the activities we want to do this year and next, to improve woodland habitats in our three counties, for dormice and other woodland wildlife.

They need us!
We are asking you to give dormice a fighting chance of survival. A donation will help cover the costs of improving woodlands on our reserves to provide a suitable habitat for dormice and other woodland species to feed, breed, hibernate, and so survive.

How will your money help us?
Whatever you can give will help to give more protection to endangered dormice and other woodland species. Here are some examples of what your money could do:

  • restore important hedgerow habitats and connect fragments of woodland.
  • enable a volunteer group to undertake important coppicing work.
  • help us survey sites on our reserves to monitor the local population of dormice.

Watch a dormouse in action
Because dormice are so rare, shy and nocturnal you’re unlikely to see one in the wild and because they are a protected species they must only be touched by licensed handlers. Click on the video below to watch a dormouse in action.

Click here to donate.

BirdTrends 2018 Report

The BTO’s BirdTrends report is a one-stop shop for information about the population status of the common breeding birds of the wider UK countryside. The report is based on data gathered by the many thousands of volunteers who contribute to BTO-led surveys.

For each of 121 species, users can quickly access the latest information on trends in population size, breeding performance and survival rates, as measured by our long-term monitoring schemes. For each species, you will find…

Click here to read the rest of the article.: BirdTrends 2018: trends in numbers, breeding success and survival for UK breeding birds | BTO – British Trust for Ornithology

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 18 November 2018

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 18 November 2018 10:00-16:00hrs.

The reserve is open to friends and family, bring the neighbours too.
Stop off at the centre for a fresh cuppa and a piece of home-made cake.
Buy a unique pre-Christmas gift and some bird-seed too.

Also, Andy Harding, the County Bird Recorder, will be taking his monthly wildfowl count this morning. He is willing to take a group along to the hides and will help with identifying ducks and other birds. Please meet at 10:00 a.m. at the Centre.

Free Citizen Science Course

Linford Lakes NR BioBlitz by David Easton. 24 June 2016

Linford Lakes NR BioBlitz by David Easton. 24 June 2016

Welcome to this free online introductory course about citizen science – the participation of people outside science (universities, research centres and government bodies) in scientific research.

This 5-module course will introduce you to the concept of citizen science and give you an accessible overview of some of the important aspects of citizen science, such as IT, understanding participants’ motivations, evaluation and environmental citizen science.

The course was developed as part of the NERC-funded Opening up science for all! project. It was designed to be very accessible for anyone interested in citizen science. For a more comprehensive and academic course, see the free UCL course ‘Introduction to Citizen Science & Scientific Crowdsourcing’, which this course was partly built on.

Click here for more information.: CitizenScienceCourse

Roads for humans and nature

Understanding the value of our roadside hedges and verges. The Cornwall AONB Unit is working in partnership with the Environment & Sustainability Institute (University of Exeter) to study hedges and road verges. The four year project is exploring their role in conserving nature and providing…

Click here to read the rest of the article.: ROADS FOR HUMANS AND NATURE — The Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Spread of the harlequin ladybird  in Britain and Ireland

Invasive alien species are widely recognized as one of the main threats to global biodiversity. Rapid flow of information on the occurrence of invasive alien species is critical to underpin effective action. Citizen science, i.e. the involvement of volunteers in science, provides an opportunity to improve the information available on invasive alien species. Here we describe the dataset created via a citizen science approach to track the spread of a well-studied invasive alien species, the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Britain and Ireland.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Spread of a model invasive alien species, the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis in Britain and Ireland | Scientific Data

Plantlife To Save And Protect ‘Atlantic’ Woodlands

  • National Lottery backs conservation work to safeguard woodlands celebrated by Wordsworth, Coleridge and Tolkien
  • Wonderful ‘Atlantic’ woodlands and their plants face severe challenges from climate change, air pollution, tree diseases and changes in management
  • Emergency management will safeguard some of our most rare and threatened lichen communities, such as the string-of-sausages lichen Usnea articulata and the ‘stinky’ Stictas that smell of fish

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Plantlife :: Plantlife To Save And Protect ‘Atlantic’ Woodlands

RSPBNBLG fun quiz night 23 November 2018

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are hosting a talk:

Our Annual General Knowledge Fun Quiz Night

Teams of up to FIVE people – bring your own team or come along and join up with others.
£4 per person and a prize for each member of the winning team.
Extra “Spot round” in the interval for £1 – with an individual prize.
Wicken Sports Club will sell refreshments: tea, coffee and a bar.
Please book in advance by Friday 16 November
To Ann Davies e-mail: AnnRSPBNBucks@hotmail.co.uk

Time: Doors open 7.30pm for a prompt 8pm start

Price: £4 per person for main quiz, £1 per person for interval “spot” round

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

Managing Water Soldier for dragonflies

The floating Water Soldier plant, with its characteristic spiky leaves and white flowers, naturally grows in the fens and broads of Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. However, its popularity as a garden pond plant has resulted in its introduction and spread outside of its original native range. In this short document we discuss the ecological benefits of Water Soldier, as well as the management of introduced Water Soldier colonies.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Water Soldier | british-dragonflies.org.uk

10 Lichens, mosses and fungi to look out for

During autumn and winter our woodland wildflowers are thin on the ground. Most will wait until spring before blooming again. But that doesn’t mean there is nothing to see…

No longer overshadowed by their more garish relatives, its the perfect time to discover the mosses, lichens and fungi that call our woodlands home. For while they may be small, they are no less beautiful. Below, Ray Woods presents ten worth looking out for, next time you take a walk in the woods.

Click here to read the rest of the article.: 10 Lichens, mosses and fungi to look out for | Celebrating our woodlands | Explore Nature

Golden Plover – the moult period is longer than the breeding season

In waders (shorebirds), the main moult (molt) usually takes place after the migration that follows the breeding season. Golden Plovers adopt a different strategy, starting wing moult while still nesting. Given that these adult birds are not going to fly anywhere any time soon, this seems like a very efficient strategy. So, why do Icelandic and Scandinavian Golden Plovers moult differently? Is this a reflection of available resources?

Click here to read the rest of the article.: Starting moult early | wadertales