Category Archives: News

RSPBNBLG Walk – Willen Lake on 1 January 2018

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are leading a field trip to Willen Lake on 1 January 2018:

Location: Meet car park (still free!) off V11 Tongwell Street, just north of Pineham (V11/H5) roundabout: SP 883 404.

Shake off the post-Xmas blues (and start your 2018 year-list) with a gentle stroll round this local gem.

Leader: Chris Ward

All welcome

Time: 10 am to 12.30 pm

Price: Freeblockquote>
See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

New genus of extinct North America horses discovered

Scientists have discovered a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that roamed North America during the last ice age. The new findings are based on an analysis of ancient DNA from fossils of the enigmatic ‘New World stilt-legged horse’ excavated from sites such as Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming, Gypsum Cave in Nevada, and the Klondike goldfields of Canada’s Yukon Territory.

Source: A horse is a horse, of course, of course — except when it isn’t: Analysis of ancient DNA reveals a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that once roamed North America — ScienceDaily

Peppered moth larvae change colour to match their twig

Camouflage, and in particular background-matching, is one of the most common anti-predator strategies observed in nature. Animals can improve their match to the colour/pattern of their surroundings through background selection, and/or by plastic colour change.

Source: Colour change of twig-mimicking peppered moth larvae is a continuous reaction norm that increases camouflage against avian predators [PeerJ]

The Earth Is Humming

Our blue planet spins suspended in outer space—and it hums, too.

European researchers say the Earth’s incessant hum originates from the bottom of the ocean. This study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters in November, gleans material from ocean-bottom seismometer stations, contrasting with previous data from vibration tools based on land.

“It’s like taking a piano and slamming all the keys at the same time,” says Spahr Webb of Columbia University’s Earth Institute, who was not associated with the study. “Except they’re not nice harmonics. They’re oddball frequencies.”

Click here to read the rest of the article: Ocean-Bottom Monitors Pick Up On Earth’s Constant Hum

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 17 December 2017

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve showing observation deck by Peter Hassett

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve showing observation deck by Peter Hassett

Open Sunday 17 December 2017

10am -3pm

In view of the cancelled Open Sunday last week-end due to the adverse weather conditions it has been decided to hold a modified Open Sunday this coming Sunday (17th Dec).

Andy Harding will be conducting his monthly duck count in the morning of 17th. Andy is willing to take interested visitors with him to the hide and assist with bird identification. Please join Andy at the Centre for 10:30am.

This can be a great time of year for spotting some of our winter visitors, who can turn up in good numbers to rest up and feed.

The Open Sunday will conclude at 3pm on this day, due to the short daylight hours at this time of year.

The Centre will be open for hot drinks and homemade cakes. Xmas crafts and Calendars on sale for those last minute gifts. Get your bargain holiday read from our second-hand books on sale.

Family and friends welcome.

Please note there will be NO CHRISTMAS WREATH MAKING TODAY.

Public Inquiry.

The Public Inquiry relating to the development at Linford Lakes is on-going. The Investigator has adjourned the Inquiry which will meet again on 26th Jan and if required again on 2nd Feb. Decision 4-5 weeks after that.

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English elm is a 2,000-year-old Roman clone

The outbreak of Dutch elm disease in the 1970s ravaged European elm populations, killing more than 25 million trees in Britain alone; the greatest impact was on Ulmus procera, otherwise known as the English elm. Here we use molecular and historical information to show that this elm derives from a single clone that the Romans transported from Italy to the Iberian peninsula, and from there to Britain, for the purpose of supporting and training vines. Its highly efficient vegetative reproduction and its inability to set seeds have preserved this clone unaltered for 2,000 years as the core of the English elm population–and the preponderance of this susceptible variety may have favoured a rapid spread of the disease.

 

Click here to read the rest of the article: Phylogeography: English elm is a 2,000-year-old Roman clone (PDF Download Available)

UK’s birds  affected by climate change

Migratory birds are arriving in the UK earlier each spring and leaving later each autumn, a study shows.

A number of articles have been written following the publication of The State of the UK’s Birds 2017 report, examining the statuses of the UK’s breeding and non-breeding bird species.

The report analyses long-term data, allowing scientists to track the effects of climate change.

Click on the links below for more information:
BBC News
Discover Wildlife

Saving the Willow Tit

The Willow Tit – the small bird that thinks it’s a woodpecker. This endearing mimic is the only English tit species to excavate a new nest hole each breeding season, rather than using existing cavities. They don’t quite equal woodpeckers in terms of pecking power, so they prefer to hollow out old rotting stumps, which provide a nice soft alternative.

Click here to read the rest of the article: Why the Willow Tit? – Back From The Brink

Cold Comfort for Butterflies

The Met Office is forecasting a cold month ahead and the conventional wisdom among butterfly enthusiasts is that cold winters are generally better for butterflies than warm ones. There was little hard evidence to back up this perception, until this year when a team of scientists from the University of East Anglia, Butterfly Conservation and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology published new research into the effects of weather on the abundance of UK butterflies.

Click on the link for more information: Butterfly Conservation – Cold Comfort

Wildflower-rich meadows

Wildflower-rich meadows are very rare and important habitats. Some of these grasslands support an amazing number of wildflower species as well as providing habitats for many species of birds, invertebrates, amphibians and mammals. In particular they provide very important supplies of pollen and nectar for bumblebees and other insect pollinators. (FarmWildlife)

Click on the link for more information: F&FF – Technical and Business Information

New Nature magazine December 2017 published

New Nature magazine December 2017

New Nature magazine December 2017

New Nature is the only natural history magazine written, edited and produced entirely by young people: by young ecologists, conservationists, communicators, nature writers and wildlife photographers each boasting an undying passion for the natural world. It is intended, foremost, as a celebration of nature, but also of the young people giving their time, freely, to protect it.

Click here to download the magazine

BTO Preliminary report on 2017 breeding season

The primary aim of BTO surveys is to monitor changes in the health of Britain’s birds, tracking declines and increases via the BTO/JNCC/RSPB Breeding Bird Survey and exploring the factors driving them through bird ringing and nest recording. The long-term trends in abundance, survival and breeding success generated by these schemes are presented on the BirdTrends webpages.

This report provides a preliminary assessment of the 2017 breeding season in terms of population sizes and breeding success, comparing this year’s results to the averages recorded over the previous five seasons.

lick here to read the rest of the article: Preliminary report on the 2017 breeding season | BTO – British Trust for Ornithology

Mixed fortunes for rare seabirds

One of the UK’s rarest breeding seabirds, little terns face numerous challenges to raise their chicks. In 2017, a total of 617 juvenile little terns fledged from colonies in the UK.

This is fewer than the 709 fledglings in 2016, but higher than the average for the five-year period before the current conservation project began (average of 609 fledglings per year between 2009 and 2013).

Click here to read the rest of the article: Mixed fortunes for rare seabirds | Discover Wildlife

Using mobile phones to identify mosquitos

The direct monitoring of mosquito populations in field settings is a crucial input for shaping appropriate and timely control measures for mosquito-borne diseases. Here, we demonstrate that commercially available mobile phones are a powerful tool for acoustically mapping mosquito species distributions worldwide. We show that even low-cost mobile phones with very basic functionality are capable of sensitively acquiring acoustic data on species-specific mosquito wingbeat sounds, while simultaneously recording the time and location of the human-mosquito encounter. We survey a wide range of medically important mosquito species, to quantitatively demonstrate how acoustic recordings supported by spatio-temporal metadata enable rapid, non-invasive species identification. As proof-of-concept, we carry out field demonstrations where minimally-trained users map local mosquitoes using their personal phones. Thus, we establish a new paradigm for mosquito surveillance that takes advantage of the existing global mobile network infrastructure, to enable continuous and large-scale data acquisition in resource-constrained areas.

Source: Using mobile phones as acoustic sensors for high-throughput mosquito surveillance | eLife

First interstellar asteroid

For the first time ever astronomers have studied an asteroid that has entered the Solar System from interstellar space. Observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that this unique object was traveling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. It appears to be a dark, reddish, highly-elongated rocky or high-metal-content object.

Source: First interstellar asteroid is like nothing seen before: VLT reveals dark, reddish and highly-elongated object — ScienceDaily

RSPBNBLG Talk – Hedgehogs on 14 December 2017

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are hosting a talk:

“Hedgehogs” – Dr Pat Morris, President of the British Hedgehog Preservation Society
Location: The Cruck Barn, City Discovery Centre, Bradwell Abbey, Milton Keynes

Postcode: MK13 9AP (Google map)

Many of us would describe the hedgehog as Britain’s favourite mammal.
Pat is Britain’s foremost authority on hedgehogs and has studied these wonderful animals for over 40 years. years. His talk will cover garden hedgehogs, how far do they roam, effects of putting out food for them, diet and impact on birds (including the controversy about predation on bird colonies in the Hebrides), hedgehog survival and current population status and the impact of caring for sick and injured hedgehogs and their subsequent release into the wild.

Time: Doors open 7.15pm for a prompt 7.45pm start, ends at 10pm

Price: Group members £3, Non-group members £4, Children £1

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

Dinosaurs & Ichthyosaurs of Britain – lecture 13 December 2017

Dinosaurs lecture 13Dec17-2

With Jurassic World 2 currently set to be released next year palaeontologist and fossil detective Dean Lomax takes us on a journey back to the amazing British finds that sparked the original dinomania in the 1800s. From the ‘invention’ of dinosaurs to the great granddad of T. rex, he reveals British dinosaur and ichthyosaur discoveries, including recent identification of new species and some incredibly rare finds.

Dean Lomax is an internationally recognised multi-award-winning palaeontologist, science communicator and author. He has travelled the globe and worked on many fascinating projects from excavating dinosaurs in the American West, to describing new species of extinct marine reptiles and winning a gold medal for excellence in science. A visiting scientist at The University of Manchester, Dean is passionate about communicating palaeontology with the public and regularly appears on television, including as series advisor and recurring on-screen expert presenter for ITV’s Dinosaur Britain. He has written two books, numerous scientific papers, and many popular articles. Dean is also the patron of the UK Association of Fossil Hunters (UKAFH).

Click here for more information: Abingdon School

India closes the loophole threatening vultures

This week, the Indian Government took an important step towards preventing the extinction of Asia’s Critically Endangered vultures by upholding the ban on large vials of diclofenac, a painkiller that is fatal to vultures. The judge was on the vultures’ side throughout, preferring to call them “sanitary workers” rather than “scavenging birds”.

Click here to read the rest of the article: India closes the loophole threatening the recovery of Asia’s vultures | BirdLife

Wildlife crimes going unpunished without proper reporting

Crimes against wildlife are going unpunished, as crime figures aren’t properly recorded and assessed, warns a wildlife coalition as it launches a new report [1] today: ‘The Recording of Wildlife Crime in England and Wales’. The report is being launched at the National Wildlife Crime Enforcers Annual Conference

Click here to read the rest of the article: Wildlife crimes going unpunished without proper reporting

BTO Goldfinch Feeding Survey – winter 2015/16

An amazing 5,183 households took part in our Gold nch Feeding Survey over the winter, which was run to determine what exactly it is about our gardens that Gold nches nd attractive. While the analysis of the results is ongoing, Kate Plummer and Clare Simm reveal the initial ndings.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 10 December 2017

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 10 December 2017 (note 2nd Sunday)

With Xmas Craft Making Event.

Suitable for people of all ages, each session includes full tuition

and all materials to enable you to make and take home traditional

Christmas Decorations, using natural materials.

 The Christmas Craft sessions will run from

11am to 12.30pm and from 1.30pm to 3pm

 Please note Children under 16 are welcome,

to be accompanied by a responsible adult.

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BuBC trip – London Wetland Centre 10 December 2017

Oystercatcher ©Peter Hassett, Floodplain Forest NR 19 June 2017

Oystercatcher ©Peter Hassett, Floodplain Forest NR 19 June 2017

Buckinghamshire Bird Club will be hosting a field trip on 10 Dec 2017 – 00: to 00:00 at London Wetland Centre, Queen Elizabeth Walk, Barnes (Lat/Long 51.4756 and -0.236873).

Click here for more information:

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

Natural History Museum expands online collections

Examples of some of the Lepidoptera specimens available on the Data Portal.

Examples of some of the Lepidoptera specimens available on the Data Portal.

The final batch of data from the iCollections project has now been released through the Museum’s Data Portal – a total of 260,000 Lepidoptera specimen records, bringing the total number of Museum specimen records accessible on the Portal to just over 3.8 million.

Click on the link for more information: A Flutter of Data | Digital Collections Programme | Blogs from the Natural History Museum

Current status of Red Deer and Roe Deer in Scotland

 

Responding to a request for information on the status of deer in Scotland, BTO researchers Dario Massimino and John Calladine analysed data on Red Deer and Roe Deer distribution and abundance, collected through the BTO/JNCC/RSPB Breeding Bird Survey.

Click on the link for more information: Modelled abundance and change in abundance of Red Deer and Roe Deer in Scotland from Breeding Bird Survey data | BTO – British Trust for Ornithology

Feeding Red Kites

Red Kite

Red Kite by Peter Hassett

Red Kites were once such urban birds that Shakespearian London was ‘the city of kites and crows’. Lacking modern sanitation, the streets provided rich pickings. Yet, although the species has now been reintroduced across the UK, our towns and cities are far cleaner. Mel Orros explores why hundreds are now visiting Reading.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

RSPBNBLG Walk – The Lodge 6 December 2017

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are leading a field trip to The Lodge on 6 December 2017:

Location: Meet in the car park (free to members) behind the shop on the south side of the B1042 Sandy to Potton road

WC near the shop. Please note there will be some steep paths with steps and tree roots.

Leader : George Conchie
Postcode: SG19 2DL (Google map)

After a wander through landscaped gardens, hilly pinewoods, old quarries and restored heathland – where better to buy Christmas presents than the RSPB shop? We hope to look inside this elegant house too.

Time: 10 am to 1 pm

Price: Free to members (Parking charge for non-members)

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

Why is the Red List so important?

Red: a colour of alarm, urgency, passion and energy. For most conservationists, “The Red List” evokes all four of these feelings, perhaps all at once. The Red List tells us which species are most in danger and which to conserve first. It is also a powerful tool for persuading governments to protect threatened species, and for most of the plant and animal species worldwide, it is vital. The Red List is nicknamed the “barometer of life”, for it is a rich compendium of information on the threats to species, their ecological requirements, where they live, and information on conservation actions that can be taken to reduce their risk of extinction.

In full, it’s called The IUCN [International Union for the Conservation of Nature] Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, and BirdLife International is the authority for birds, coordinating the process of evaluating all of the world’s bird species against the Red List categories and criteria in order to assess their extinction risk.

Click on the link to read the rest of the article: Why is the Red List so important? | BirdLife

Red Kite Survey

Red Kite by Harry Appleyard, Tattenhoe Park 19 April 2016

Red Kite by Harry Appleyard, Tattenhoe Park 19 April 2016

Why pollinator biodiversity is important

In a new review paper that’s just been published in the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics I have looked at the question of just how diverse the pollinators are, and why pollinator biodiversity is ecologically important and therefore worthy of conservation.  I’ve taken a deep time and wide space approach to this, starting with what the fossil record tells us about when animal pollination evolved and the types of organisms that acted as pollinators in the past (the answer may surprise you if you’re unfamiliar with the recent paleontological literature on this topic).  Some of the most prominent biogeographical patterns have been highlighted, and I have tried to estimate the global diversity of currently known pollinators.  A conclusion is that as many as 1 in 10 described animal species may act as pollen vectors.

Click here to read the rest of the article: Pollinator biodiversity and why it’s important: a new review just published – download it for free | Jeff Ollerton’s Biodiversity Blog

Warriors Protecting Elephants

From afar, the cries of a baby elephant in distress seem almost human. Drawn by the sounds, young Samburu warriors, long spears in hand, thread their way toward a wide riverbed, where they find the victim. The calf is half-submerged in sand and water, trapped in one of the hand-dug wells that dot the valley. Only its narrow back can be seen—and its trunk, waving back and forth like a cobra.

Click here to read the rest of the article: Warriors Who Once Feared Elephants Now Protect Them

Talk: Hazel Dormice 22 November 2017 Linford Lakes NR

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 19 November 2017

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

 Talk: Hazel Dormice

Date: 22nd November 2017

Time: 7.30pm-9pm.

Location: Linford Lakes Nature Reserve

The Hazel Dormouse being nocturnal and rarely seen was believed to be endangered in Britain in the 1990s.  Learn  about the speakers  project to release these small mammals in a local wood in 1998 and their present status locally.

More information regarding this project can be found here:-

http://mknhs.org.uk/dormouse-project/

 Price: £3, Age Range: Over 16 Meeting Place: Linford Lakes Nature Reserve.  Booking Required: Yes

Click here to book.

National Hedgehog Survey

Long-term studies by ourselves, People’s Trust for Endangered Species, and the British Trust for Ornithology have found that hedgehogs have undergone a drastic decline within Britain over the last two decades (see State of Britain’s Hedgehogs 2011). Our humble hedgehog is now listed as a species of principal importance to protect.

Click on the link for more information: National Hedgehog Survey – Peoples Trust for Endangered Species

Identifying Redshanks from Spotted Redshanks

Redshanks are a common wader found, year-round, on the marshes of the north Norfolk coast. At any time of year, on a visit to RSPB Titchwell, Snettisham or the NWT Holme Dunes you often see redshanks probing their bills into the mud for insects, worms, and crustaceans. This year has even seen them returning to breed on nearby Roydon Common, the first time in 40 years. Winter sees the numbers grow as more birds arrive from Iceland, spending their winters in the UK.

The Autumn and winter months can also bring a small number of the much rarer Spotted Redshanks. Most of these birds are passing through the UK but with a few overwintering on the marshes in this part of the UK. At this time its not uncommon to hear about local sightings of Greenshanks on their migration to their African wintering grounds. In recent years, a number of these have overwintered on the estuaries of SW England.

Click on the link to read the rest of the article: Help with Identifying Redshanks from Spotted Redshanks

Impact of weather on  butterfly populations

Silver-washed-Fritillary by Julian Lambley Bernwood Butterfly trail 24June 2017

Silver-washed-Fritillary by Julian Lambley Bernwood Butterfly trail 24June 2017

The aim was to assess the sensitivity of butterfly population dynamics to variation in weather conditions across their geographical ranges, relative to sensitivity to density dependence, and determine whether sensitivity is greater towards latitudinal range margins.

Click here to read the rest of the article: European butterfly populations vary in sensitivity to weather across their geographical ranges – Mills – 2017 – Global Ecology and Biogeography – Wiley Online Library

The limits of phenology

Henry David Thoreau monitored flowering times in Concord from 1852 to 1858; his data is a key component in our study. Photo by Richard Primack and Abe Miller-Rushing.

Henry David Thoreau monitored flowering times in Concord from 1852 to 1858; his data is a key component in our study. Photo by Richard Primack and Abe Miller-Rushing.

Species must either adapt in-place to survive climate change or migrate elsewhere to track their prefered environmental conditions. Increasingly, the phenologies of species – the timing of their life history events – are changing in spring, with flowers opening earlier, or birds migrating sooner. Measuring the degree of this phenological change is challenging because it’s difficult to get good data before climate changed (when did plants start flowering in the past?), and it’s hard to be certain when an event actually took place (On a Saturday in spring you noticed the first violet flower; did they first flower that day, or during the past week when you were busier?). In our paper, we apply a new method to estimate the onset of events, allowing us to more precisely combine historic herbarium and museum data with contemporary observations to detect evidence of climate change.

Click here to read the rest of the article: The limits of phenology | Nature Ecology & Evolution Community

UK will back total ban on bee-harming pesticides

The UK will back a total ban on insect-harming pesticides in fields across Europe, the environment secretary, Michael Gove, has revealed.

The decision reverses the government’s previous position and is justified by recent new evidence showing neonicotinoids have contaminated the whole landscape and cause damage to colonies of bees. It also follows the revelation that 75% of all flying insects have disappeared in Germany and probably much further afield, a discovery Gove said had shocked him.

Click here to read the rest of the article: UK will back total ban on bee-harming pesticides, Michael Gove reveals | Environment | The Guardian

Most complete tyrannosaur fossil is found

A fossilized skeleton of a tyrannosaur discovered in Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was airlifted by helicopter Oct 15, and delivered to the Natural History Museum of Utah where it will be uncovered, prepared, and studied. The fossil is approximately 76 million years old and is likely an individual of the species Teratophoneus curriei.

Click on the link to read the rest of the article: New tyrannosaur fossil is most complete found in Southwestern US: Researchers are amazed to find nearly complete skeleton with many bones in life position — ScienceDaily

Back From The Brink

Grey Heron by Harry Appleyard, Howe Park Wood 19 April 2016

Grey Heron by Harry Appleyard, Howe Park Wood 19 April 2016

Back from the Brink is one of the most ambitious conservation projects ever undertaken.
Its aim – to save 20 species from extinction and benefit over 200 more through 19 projects that span England; from the tip of Cornwall to Northumberland.

It’s the first time ever that so many conservation organisations have come together with one focus in mind – to bring back from the brink of extinction some of England’s most threatened species of animal, plant and fungi. Explore the diverse projects below to find out more about the special species we’ll be saving, the places we’re be working and how you can get involved and make a difference.

Click on the link for more information: The projects – Back From The Brink

British Wildlife Photography awards 2017

Daniel Trim’s airport-roosting pied wagtail has won the 2017 competition, which celebrates the work of amateur and professional photographers and the beauty and diversity of British wildlife. Winning images are chosen from thousands of entries, including film and junior categories.

More than 100 images are on show at the Mall Galleries in London, before touring nationally

Click on the link for more information: The British Wildlife Photography awards 2017 – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

FSC Course – Mosses &Liverwort Identification 18 November 2017

An introduction the field identification of mosses and liverworts, using characters that can be seen using a hand lens. During the day the field characters of mosses and liverworts will be examined and we will identify a number of common species that can be found in London. Based in Bushy Park.

Click on the link for more information: Mosses and Liverwort Field Identification – 66168 – FSC

RSPBNBLG Quiz – Wicken Sports Club 24 November 2017

RSPB logoThe RSPB North Bucks Local Group are hosting a talk:

Location: Wicken Sports Club, Wicken, Milton Keynes – just 15 minutes from Central Milton Keynes.
Postcode: MK19 6BU Google map

Our Annual Fun Quiz Night.
Bring your own team (of up to 6 people) or come along and join others on the night.
£4 per person – a prize for each member of the winning team.
An extra “spot round” during the interval – with an individual prize for the winner.
Wicken Sports Club will provide refreshments – tea, coffee and a licensed bar.

Please book in advance by Friday 17 November – to AnnRSPBNBucks@hotmail.co.uk

Time: Doors open 7.30pm for an 8pm start

Price: £4 per person

Booking essential

Telephone: 07803905958

E-mail: AnnRSPBNBucks@hotmail.co.uk

See the RSPB North Bucks Local Group website for more information

MKNHS is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites. You should check details of any events listed on external sites with the organisers.

Relocated squirrels moving to new areas

Red squirrels relocated to woodlands in the north west Highlands are “flourishing and breeding”, according to a conservation charity.

More than 80 squirrels were trapped in other parts of the Highlands in phases of the project led by Findhorn-based Trees for Life.

The animals were released in areas that had no squirrels, including Shieldaig.

Click here to read the rest of the article: Relocated squirrels moving to new areas, says charity – BBC News

Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming

Scientists have discovered that Earth’s sea level did not rise steadily when the planet’s glaciers last melted during a period of global warming; rather, sea level rose sharply in punctuated bursts.

Click on the link to read the rest of the article: Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming: Reefs near Texas endured punctuated bursts of sea-level rise before drowning — ScienceDaily

New Nature magazine published

New Nature Magazine Issue 11

New Nature Magazine Issue 11

New Nature is the only natural history magazine written, edited and produced entirely by young people: by young ecologists, conservationists, communicators, nature writers and wildlife photographers each boasting an undying passion for the natural world. It is intended, foremost, as a celebration of nature, but also of the young people giving their time, freely, to protect it.

Click here to download the magazine

House sparrow decline linked to air pollution and poor diet

Female house sparrow drinking dirty water. Credit: © VOLODYMYR KUCHERENKO / Fotolia

Female house sparrow drinking dirty water. Credit: © VOLODYMYR KUCHERENKO / Fotolia

House sparrows are well-adapted to living in urban areas, so it is surprising their numbers have fallen significantly over the past decades. An investigation into this worrying trend finds that sparrows living in urban areas are adversely affected by pollution and poor nutrition. The study also finds the birds suffer more during the breeding season, when resources are needed to produce healthy eggs.

Click on the link to read the rest of the article: House sparrow decline linked to air pollution and poor diet: City sparrows suffer from more stress than their country cousins, find Spanish researchers, especially during breeding season — ScienceDaily

New draft Silphidae guide

Draft interactive ID guide for Silphidae

Draft interactive ID guide for Silphidae Carrion Beetle

A new draft interactive ID guide for Silphidae (Silphidae is a family of beetles that are known commonly as large carrion beetles, carrion beetles or burying beetles) is available for download: goo.gl/FMVZ3i

The Tree Charter is launched

“A new forest charter that aims to put trees and woods back at the heart of people’s lives has been launched on the 800th anniversary of the original.

Click on the link for more information: Charter

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 19 November 2017

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Linford Lakes Nature Reserve visitors enjoying an Open Sunday

Open Sunday at Linford Lakes NR 19 November 2017 10:00-16:00hrs.

 The centre and the reserve are available for you, your family and friends to enjoy,

 as well as the usual Open Sunday treats.

You are invited to join Keith on a guided walk on the Periphery Path. 

This event will take place at 10:30 from the centre.

On sale are crafts, gifts and bird seed.

Also on sale, the FoLLNR calendar 2018,

Glorious shots, to grace your wall all year.

They make wonderful gifts.

Only £5.00.

Profits from sales go to fund future projects at the reserve.

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